The power of journaling

Hey all!

So I have spoken a bit in the past about journaling and thought this week would be a good time to discuss it. As we come to Autumn in a few weeks and many people start to take stock of the year ending and year beginning. I find I am quite reflective as I cosy down in blanket nests, certainly.

So journaling, at its core essence, is writing your thoughts and feelings, privately for you. It has become quite a popular technique in therapeutic settings in recent years as well as in the wellness industry. Journaling has also become popular through a technique known as Bullet Journaling which can be made into art for many people, but I will not be discussing that. There are an endless amount of ways to journal, depending upon your needs and is a versatile activity.

Journaling for you mental health can be a brilliant tool and is recommended by a lot of clinicians, it has the benefits of reducing worry and stress, improving the ability to rationalise and improving mood. Using journaling can help you organise and priorities thoughts, reflect on behaviours, track moods and symptoms also.

I used to journal quite a lot when I was younger, often writing page after page after page my thoughts and feelings. However, by the time I started therapy, I realised I could turn this into a more effective strategy for me. This is because I did not really feel much better and when journaling can help us reflect, I cringed at what I read which should most definitely not be the case. I started a new method for a therapy journal last year using a key for what I had learned in the session, a part for my homework and a part for reflections.

For my birthday, my best friend gifted me a wonderful journal to track sleep and my mood, noting a cause of the mood but with only space for a couple of sentences. I loved this because it really made me consider my mood and be able to learn from what was going on. I learned just how sensitive I was to lack of sleep, or lack of food. I was still doing my rambles in another journal, but when I became really low I found that I just did not want to write anything, which lessened the impact of this well-being tool.

Now that journal has been filled up, I have created my own in a basic red notebook. Underneath the date I list the rough time I fell asleep, woke up and how many hours I had to sleep, then comment on the quality or if I had woken up. I then reflect on how I am feeling at the end of the day and briefly state why. I go on to create a ‘highlight reel’ of things I have done that day, no matter how repetitive or mundane it may seem, this helps me when I have an off day to see how much I did actually accomplish. Finally, I list a minimum of two things I am grateful for.

I have seen a greater increase in my own engagement with this streamlined journaling method, I can easily reflect on what I am doing well and where I feel I could make improvements upon my own life and spot patterns in my behaviour. I certainly think my method will change in the years to come but for the time being I am happy with what I am doing.

Do you have a particular journaling method, let me know!

Kindness to you all,

L x

5 thoughts on “The power of journaling

  1. I use a bullet journal to keep track of my mood, what I’m doing, how my symptoms are, etc. My memory is crap, and it helps me see patterns that I probably wouldn’t notice otherwise.

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    1. I am SO glad bullet journaling works for you, it definitely has a lot of accessibility, for myself I found the upkeep of it to be a bit draining at times and I can so easily fall into the trap of not doing what is actually good for me. I suppose, my current journaling method could be considered just a very, very streamlined method of a bullet journal. Do you have any advice for others who may be interested 🙂

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      1. I have a really basic layout, and it’s not artistic at all. For each month, I have one calendar page as a monthly overview, one calendar page to rate mood and track key emotions, two grid pages for a habit & symptom tracker, a couple of pages for daily gratitude entries, and half a page for a summary of what happened each week. It only takes me about five minutes each day.

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      2. Wow that sounds absolutely brilliant 🙂 I can see why it’s useful! I definitely love the gratitude aspect, I found expressing gratitude even in a journal makes all the difference as time goes on. There’s also the What Went Well technique in positive psychology that I really like as a way of reframing the day 🙂

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